infinitelemur

Help my octopus please?

infinitelemur:

Aaaaag I’m knitting a sweater with a big multi-colored octopus on the front, and I’m finding it impossible not to have long floats. I’m doing stranded knitting and weaving in as I go, but because I’m working in the round that doesn’t eliminate the problem of my secondary colors being on the wrong side when I come back around to the octopus. Any sage advice, or is this hopeless?

If you’re curious: I’m putting this octopus (in two shades of green) on a gray boat-necked top-down raglan sweater.
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That is a great chart! The problem is, you can’t have this single motif knit in the round without INSANE floats. If you’re knitting in the round and you don’t use the yarn you used for the motif for the rest of the round, when you get back to the motif your yarn will be on the wrong side. Your only two options are to knit the sweater flat, carry the yarn around the sweater by twisting it around your working yarn (yuck) or (double yuck) using duplicate stitch for the motif. Obviously I would recommend rethinking your sweater pattern. Maybe do a cardi instead of a pullover and have the design across the back? you could also turn the work in the back and sew it together nicely. Another option is to do a pattern done in pieces rather than a seamless pattern.

coldlings

Knitting Help?

bloodlaceandbones:

Can you knitters explain something to me that I just can’t wrap my head around? So, I understand colour changes to a certain point. For example, I understand how to switch colours if say I’m making a scarf and I do 10 rows of black, 10 rows of white, 10 rows of black etc. That makes sense. BUT, when people do like 5 stitches of black, 2 stitches of white, 5 stitches of black etc in a single row, I just don’t understand that. Do you cut the end of the white yarn everytime you change it in the row or just drop it and pick it up later? And if you pick it up, wouldn’t that leave a long string of white across the black stitches because you didn’t cut it off? I hope this makes sense. -_-

What you’re describing is calledcolorwork.Colorwork is when you create a pattern using different colors of yarn.

There are many types of colorwork, but two are the most commonly used. Those types are called Fair Isle, and Intarsia.

When doing Intarsia, you cut the yarn to the length you need before you start knitting. If I were to knit something, say, Argyle, I would cut the length of yarn I would need for one diamond. At first, I would knit four stitches of black. On the next stitch, I would drape the end of my white yarn over the working black yarn. Then I would knit another stitch of black, pinning the white yarn to the back of your work. Next comes your first white stitch, and so on. You need to use a separate piece for each block of color, even the spaces between your diamonds.You can use as many colors as you would like while doing Intarsia.

Conversely, Fair Isle is traditionally only worked with two colors per row. It works with more, but this creates a weirdly thick fabric, and your yarn gets tangled more easily. Fair Isle is just as you described, there are strands of color behind your stitches, called floats, so the work is not reversible. You just switch as you please, and holes aren’t usually a problem. So, were I to knit argyle, I would simply use two balls of yarn and follow my pattern as I’m knitting. As opposed to Intarsia, it is easy to knit Fair Isle in the round.

You can find tons of colorwork patterns on the web, and once you get the hang of it, there’s tons of items you can create.

melissakunz
melissakunz:

Explanation of how to work a purl if it’s the first stitch on a DPN. It’s a tricky conundrum because purling as usual tends to situate the yarn so there’s almost a yarn-over in front of the purl. I spent a good bit of time last night Googling how to solve this problem and was surprised by how many times I saw advice that amounted to “just rearrange the stitches so you never have a purl at the start”.
So anyway, this is the most important piece of knitting advice I’ve ever found.

melissakunz:

Explanation of how to work a purl if it’s the first stitch on a DPN. It’s a tricky conundrum because purling as usual tends to situate the yarn so there’s almost a yarn-over in front of the purl. I spent a good bit of time last night Googling how to solve this problem and was surprised by how many times I saw advice that amounted to “just rearrange the stitches so you never have a purl at the start”.

So anyway, this is the most important piece of knitting advice I’ve ever found.